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22 Beautiful Suicide Prevention Quotes

We all need a little inspiration. Here are 22 beautiful and empowering suicide prevention quotes for National Suicide Prevention Week.

Suicide Prevention Quotes

 

Believe in yourself and all that you are. Know that there is something inside you that is greater than any obstacle. Christian D. Larson

 

Never give up, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn. Harriet Beecher Stowe

 

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Despite the cloud of my depression and anxiety, I woke up every morning with a choice, give up or trudge through. Trudging sucks. Giving up sucks. Sometimes life comes down to the lesser of two evils. Aaron Behr

 

Having difficult times and grief and brokenness, does not mean that life is over. These are just bumps in the road, obstacles to be overcome and made stepping stones into a long successful life. Teresa St. Frances

 

Grit your teeth and let it hurt. Don’t deny it, don’t be overwhelmed by it. It will not last forever. Harold Kushner

 

I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on, and it will be better tomorrow. Maya Angelou

 

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There’s no shame in having to fight every day, but fighting every day, and presumably, if you’re still alive to hear these words or read this interview, then you are winning your war. You’re here. You might not win every battle. There are going to be some really tough days. There might be several tough times in any given single day, but hopefully, this will help somebody to think, “This isn’t easy; it is a fight, but I’m going to keep fighting.” Jared Padalecki

 

However long the night, the dawn will break. African proverb

 

Our real blessings often appear to us in the shape of pains, losses and disappointments; but let us have patience and we soon shall see them in their proper figures. Joseph Addison

 

When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on. Franklin D. Roosevelt

 

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Take a shower, wash off the day. Drink a glass of water. Make the room dark. Lie down and close your eyes. Notice the silence. Notice your heart. Still beating. Still fighting. You made it, after all. You made it, another day. And you can make it one more. You’re doing just fine. Charlotte Eriksson

 

To all who walk the dark path, and to those who walk in the sunshine but hold out a hand in the darkness to travel beside us: Brighter days are coming. Clearer sight will arrive. And you will arrive too. No, it might not be forever. The bright moments might be for a few days at a time, but hold on for those days. Those days are worth the dark. Jenny Lawson

 

Never give up. Winston Churchill

 

One of the secrets of life is to make stepping stones out of stumbling blocks. Jack Penn

 

The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

 

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“Always remember you are braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think and loved more than you know.” Christopher Robin (A.A. Milne)

 

If you were born with the weakness to fall, you were born with the strength to rise. Rupi Kaur

 

Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is more people who have come alive. Dr. Howard thurman

 

You are imperfect, you are wired for struggle, but you are worthy of love and belonging. Brené Brown

 

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Sometimes even to live is an act of courage. Seneca

 

Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all. Dale Carnegie

 

Courage does not always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, “I will try again tomorrow.” Mary Anne Radmacher

National Suicide Prevention Day

When mental health problems affect so many people around us, it’s important that we all take part in national suicide prevention day (September 10, 2018). You don’t have to go out and do something big, but start by doing something small. This year’s theme for suicide prevention is, “The Power of Connection.” But what does that mean?

The Power of Connection is all about connecting with other people and the influence that can have on mental health. When we connect with other people, we are opening ourselves up to meaningful relationships.  And when we feel like we are safe talking to someone else about our feelings, we don’t feel so alone in the world.

If you or someone you know has ever experienced depression, you’ll know that sometimes people with depression can experience a kind of downward negative spiral, where they feel trapped in negativity. These incessant, negative thoughts will leave them feeling hopeless and unmotivated. And often, they aren’t sharing these feelings with others. But when they do decide to open up to someone else, a friend can help them reframe things and help them out of the trap of hopelessness.

Connections are about more than just having business contacts through LinkedIn or virtual friends on Facebook. Connection is about finding a way to connect with others who can build you up and help you find hope.

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Making Connections on National Suicide Prevention Day

Making connections is a great way to participate in National Suicide Prevention Day. You can probably name off a couple of people you know who struggle with mental health, but there are probably a lot more who you don’t know experience difficulty with their mental health. Every day we talk to people who are suffering silently.

Because we don’t see depression or anxiety the same way we can identify a broken arm or a bruised knee, it can be hard to know who is needing our help. And perhaps some people don’t want you to know about their struggles with mental health because of the stigma associated with it.

A good rule of thumb is to just connect with the people you already know. For National Suicide Prevention Day, you don’t have to go seek out someone new. Start with the people around you. Make connections with them and let them know you care about them.

There are so many people who feel alone in the world, even when they have friends nearby. And that’s because people aren’t reaching out to each other to make connections.

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Ways to Connect

Making a connection with someone can be something so simple. Here are some ideas that you can use to connect with people:

  • Start a conversation with someone at the grocery store (such as the checkout clerk or the greeter at the door).
  • Call a friend you haven’t talked to in a while.
  • Scroll through your Facebook friends and randomly choose someone, and send them a message.
  • Sit down and join your family member in whatever they’re doing and talk to them.
  • Invite someone to go out to ice cream with you.
  • Think about which of your friends you haven’t seen or heard from in a long time, and reach out to them.
  • Tell someone why you appreciate them.
  • Make plans with someone you care about.
  • Ask people how they’re doing, and when they respond, “Good,” ask them how they’re really doing with life. Perhaps disclose how you are doing (if you are feeling stressed or sad, etc.). Self-disclosure can go a long way and help the other person feel more comfortable opening up.
  • Invite some friends over to play games or to eat dinner.

There are so many ways you can connect on National Suicide Prevention day, but don’t let the connections stop after September 10th!

Making National Suicide Prevention Day Every Day

It’s nice that there’s one day a year where everyone celebrates National Suicide Prevention Day, but extending the ideas of suicide prevention to every day is the real goal.

This year’s theme, “The Power of Connection,” is such a great theme because it speaks to something we can do every day. Don’t let a day go by without connecting with someone. Every little effort you make to connect is helping prevent suicide.

If you or someone you know is struggling, please call the national suicide hotline: 1-800-273-8255

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Suicide Prevention: Noticing the Warning Signs and How to Help

Four in five people know that suicide is preventable. But do they know how? Suicide prevention starts with knowing the warning signs and then taking action to help.

September 9th through 15th is National Suicide Prevention Week and September 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day, so we thought we’d join with the voices to prevent suicide and outline the warning signs of suicide and how to prevent suicide.

Since 1975, the National Suicide Prevention Week has brought people together to bring awareness to suicide, the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. The goal of National Suicide Prevention week is to raise awareness for the growing problem in our country and engage in discussion about mental illness, warning signs, and resources for someone struggling with thoughts of suicide. This year’s theme, “The Power of Connection”, emphasizes our ability to understand people, to love them, and to want to help them.

 

Suicide Prevention: The Warning Signs

It’s hard to tell when someone is struggling with thoughts of suicide, here’s what to watch out for according to the American Association of Suicidology and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention:

  • Talking about self harming or talking about having no purpose in life
  • Extreme mood swings
  • Impulsive or reckless behavior
  • Feeling of hopeless
  • Depression/anxiety
  • Isolating themselves/withdrawing from activities
  • Substance abuse

If you notice any of these signs in yourself, it’s important that you seek out the help of a mental health professional.

 

The Role of Therapy Suicide Prevention

There’s no one cause that determines if someone commits suicide, but an underlying mental illness can be a risk factor. Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses in the nation and is present in at least half of all cases of suicide. If you or someone you know could be struggling with depression or another mental illness, it’s important that you seek the help of a therapist.

Mental health professionals are specially trained to handle someone who may be at risk for suicide or who may be already showing signs of suicidal ideation. “Suicidal ideation” is the term that’s used to mean that someone is thinking about suicide. Therapy is a crucial step in overcoming mental illness and getting rid of suicidal thoughts.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) have been shown to be successful interventions for people with multiple suicide attempts.

Suicide Prevention: How to Help

There are multiple ways you can help in the battle of suicide prevention. Maybe you’ll be the person who will drive a loved one who’s in crisis to the emergency room, or you’re sitting next to them as they call the suicide hotline phone number. Or maybe you’re volunteering for an event to increase awareness of suicide prevention.

Here’s a list of some things you can do to support in suicide prevention.

  • If you feel that a person may be at immediate risk for suicide, call 911
  • Share the number for the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with people you know or on social media: 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
  • Get involved in volunteer opportunities near you
  • If someone you know seems more withdrawn than usual, reach out to them.
  • Read/share stories of survival and hope here

Don’t be afraid to speak up and help someone who’s struggling. The power of connection will make a difference.

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Dealing With Depression: The Basics

Dealing with depression is simply no fun. But there are some basic things that you can do to help you feel a little better. They won’t solve your problems or make you magically feel motivated. But they’ll help you take care of your body and get those natural happy chemicals (endorphins) to fill your body.

Dealing With Depression: Symptoms

But first, how do you know if you’re dealing with depression? According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, you may have depression if you experience these symptoms:

  • Feeling sad or “empty”
  • Hopelessness, helplessness, and negativity
  • Loss of interest in hobbies
  • Feeling tired and having sleep problems
  • Difficulty making decisions and concentrating
  • Low appetite or overeating
  • Irritability
  • Suicidal thoughts or attempts

If you’re feeling those symptoms, a therapist will be able to help you find more help and resources, but if you’re nervous about going to see a therapist, you still have options. You could set up a Skype or phone appointment with a therapist as well. So if dealing with depression is making it hard for you to get out of bed, you can talk to your therapist in the comfort of your own home. The National Network of Depression Centers also keeps a list of online resources that could be helpful.

Dealing With Depression: Tips

When you go to a therapist, they will help you work through the things that contribute to your depression. They might try to help you figure out what’s at the root of your depression. They may help you realize it’s genetic and that you should try taking medication. Or they may give you coping skills, such as things you can do when the depression arises.

But no matter what approach the therapist takes, they’ll probably suggest you take care of your health, which will help you feel just a bit better and more able to function.

Eat Better

When we are eating poorly, we won’t feel great. And when you’re dealing with depression, you’re already not feeling so great. So one thing you can do to help your mood is to eat good foods. Try to cut down on super sugary foods, things high in carbs, and do your best to eat balanced meals. Instead of snacking on chips, try some fruits and veggies. Eating healthy is just a small way you can improve how you feel.

Make Sure You’re Sleeping Enough

When you’re dealing with depression, you’re probably also dealing with sleep problems. Maybe you’re sleeping too much or too little. Maybe your sleep is restless. But sleeping the right amount will actually help you feel more emotionally stable and help manage your irritability. Start by creating a schedule for your sleep. Try to shoot for 8 to 9 hours of sleep per night. Make sure you don’t eat or drink caffeine a few hours before bed, and then try to go to sleep and wake up each morning around the same time. Doing this will take a while to get used to, but your body will adjust to the schedule.

Exercise

If you’re looking for a quicker fix, exercise might be the key to dealing with depression. Though it might be a chore to get out of bed, into exercise clothes, and leave the house, you’ll eventually be glad you did. When we exercise, our bodies release endorphins, which is a chemical that makes us “feel good.” That will give you a boost of energy and help you feel better.

To get more understanding about dealing with depression, watch this video called, “I had a blag dog, his name was depression” from the World Health Organization.

If you’re looking for more ways to help you deal with depression, the National Institute of Mental Health also gives great explanations about medication and other therapies that can be helpful for someone dealing with depression.

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Self-Care Activities for the Whole Family

Self-care isn’t just about being a little selfish. It’s about making time for yourself so you can feel recharged and rejuvenated. When you imagine self-care activities, what do you think of? Probably a bubble bath or a relaxing massage in a room full of candles. But you might be surprised to find out that there are some other self-care activities that can have longer-lasting results.

Self-Care Activities for Kids

Self-care activities for your kids? Yes. Though it may seem that all your children do is self-care with recess breaks from school, all the movies they watch when they’re at school, and a summer of fun. But the reality is that about a third of adolescents live with an anxiety disorder, and 21 percent of adolescents (ages 13–18) experience a severe mental disorder. And just talking to your neighbors, you might find you know more children with anxiety and depression than you thought you did.

So how do you help your children learn about self-care? You get them involved with self care before they need it and when they need it. One self-care activity that might appeal to your child is called neurofeedback therapy. Neurofeedback can help children struggling with anxiety, depression, ADD/ADHD. It can also help children on the autism spectrum and those with traumatic brain injury. A child will love the option to just watch a movie, but the movie will be programmed to help train the child’s brainwaves to get back to their optimal frequencies. Research has found that when brainwave frequencies are off, it can lead to worsened attention, sleep, anxiety, and mood, among other things.

And luckily Self-Care Week is around the corner, so Aspen Valley Counseling is even offering a discount on neurofeedback! Call to schedule your appointment after July 20 and before July 28, and you’ll only pay $37.50 per session (compared to the regular $50 per session or $100 per session of competitors).

Self-Care Activities for Mom

Moms are always busy. Moms who work outside the home have hectic days and then come home for their second shift of taking care of kids and the house. And moms who work at home never have a break to breathe. So where do they find time for self-care activities? It may not be easy, but you might be able to work in a little bit of time somewhere — and you might even be able to get your kids involved.

Finding videos at the store or online of yoga, Pilates, and dance cardio might be just what you need. These activities will get your blood flowing, your muscles stretching, and your heart rate up. But some people dread exercise, so how is sweating really self-care? To quote the movie “Legally Blonde,”: “Exercise gives you endorphins; endorphins make you happy…!” By working in just a little time to put on a video of dance cardio might just be the 15 minutes you need to make you feel a little happier.

Self-Care Activities for Dad

Now, for all the dads, getting a pedicure might not seem like your idea of self-care. Although, some dads might appreciate it because of the wonderful foot massage that comes along with the pedicure. So, what’s are good self-care activities for dad? Our culture doesn’t tend to focus so much on self-care for men, so this is an important topic to consider. Typically, men in American society are taught to bottle up their feelings so as not to appear too womanly, but turns out that isn’t very healthy. So self-care for dad might include going to therapy to learn how to express his unwanted emotions in a healthy, helpful way.

Don’t be scared dads! A therapist won’t judge you for crying, but they will help you work through your struggles and find a way to help you express yourself better.

Self-Care Activities for Grandparents

Maybe you’re a retired grandparent, or maybe you’re still working and you’ll be doing so forever. But either way, you need self-care too. A survey done by AARP found that older adults who tend to feel lonely were less likely to be involved in activities where they could build a social network. So for grandparents, self-care activities could include volunteering, going to an art or craft class, attending classes at your local recreation center, or finding an organization you’d like to participate in.

No matter what your age or circumstance, there are friends out there for you. So find something to participate in that furthers your interests, or try something new. Or if you’re just looking to help someone out, try websites like JustServe to help you get started.

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Self-Care Ideas

With international Self-Care Week and International Self-Care Day (July 24) just around the corner, it’s time to start thinking about self-care ideas that will allow you to truly take care of yourself. And just for fun, let’s start from head to toe.

Self-Care Ideas for Your Brain

There’s one part of us that’s working around the clock: our brain. Even when we go to sleep, our brain is working on processing everything that happened during the day, and sometimes we’ll get a taste of that when we sleep. Have you ever had a dream you were in a house with no doors? Then when you woke up you realized it was a representation of you feeling stressed and feeling as if there was no way out? That’s your brain processing your stress.

Self-care ideas: So how do you take care of your brain? There are many self-care ideas around this topic, but one way is through neurofeedback, a type of therapy that trains your brainwaves to reach their optimal frequencies. Because when are brainwaves are too slow or too fast, it can lead us to feeling more anxious or more depressed and even affect our ability to sleep and focus. So make sure your self-care routine includes a little time for your brain.

And for self-care week, Aspen Valley Counseling is even offering a discount on neurofeedback! Call to schedule your appointment after July 20 and before July 28, and you’ll only pay $37.50 per session (compared to the regular $50 per session or $100 per session of competitors).

Self-Care Ideas for Your Neck and Shoulders

We hold a lot of tension in our neck and shoulders because we’re constantly looking down at our phones or a computer screen. Have you ever had someone rub your shoulders and say, “Wow, you seem stressed?” Well, that’s because they can feel the tension in your muscles near your neck. When we are stressed, we naturally tense up, and that shows in our muscles.

Self-care ideas: You might consider making an appointment to get a massage or make a deal with a friend to trade a massage for a massage.

Self-Care Ideas for Your Stomach

Research shows that your gut bacteria is extremely important to your overall health. And we all know that a tummy ache is never comfortable. So, taking some time for self-care for your stomach can work miracles. Nowadays, you’ll find all sorts of suggestions for how to care for your stomach and digestive system. You might try a juice cleanse or probiotics or cut down on processed foods. If you’re going to try something drastic, make sure you consult with a doctor before you do.

Self-care ideas: Try to care for your stomach by eating balanced meals and cutting down on foods that don’t make your body feel good. Practice mindful eating, and pay attention to how the food you eat makes your body feel.

Self-Care Ideas for Your Knees

In the past 20 years, there’s been an increase in reported knee pain, so perhaps our knees need a little loving. When your knees hurt, it can affect the amount of physical activity you can do, including just walking or standing. So, taking care of your knees could save you from a future of painful walking.

Self-care ideas: You might try to take up swimming or water aerobics. The great thing about water sports is that water makes your body light and takes the weight off your knees. While you’re strengthening your body and muscles, you are being kind to your knees. A little exercise can go a long way.

Self-Care Ideas for Your Feet

If you’ve ever worn stiletto heels, you have been extremely aware of foot discomfort. Or maybe you’ve had an ingrown toenail. Ouch. But either way, all day long we are on our feet in some way or another, so what do we do for self-care when it comes to our feet?

Self-care ideas: Self-Care Week is a great excuse for a foot massage, pedicure, or maybe even acupuncture for foot pain. And if you’re up for it, maybe you can wear flats instead of heels for a week.

Self-Care Ideas for Your Soul

Then of course, we all need self-care for the soul. While all the other previous suggestions will definitely take part in caring for the soul, there are other self-care ideas that will are for the soul specifically.

Self-care ideas: You might try a therapy session, yoga, meditation, or drinking a warm tea while reading an uplifting book.

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Signs of a Toxic Relationship

If you think you or someone you know might be in a toxic relationship, you need to know the signs of a toxic relationship. Of course, if your partner or someone you know shows one sign of toxicity, then it doesn’t automatically mean that person is toxic. But perhaps it’s a good thing to address before it negatively affects your relationship.

If you’re in a toxic relationship, it’s very possible that the other person isn’t aware that they are toxic. And they probably aren’t googling “signs of a toxic relationship.” People can develop these toxic behaviors from poor decisions and unhealthy learned behaviors. But even if they have developed these behaviors from unfortunate life circumstances, it doesn’t make their behavior excusable. They still don’t have the right to treat others poorly.

The Signs of a Toxic Relationship

Here are signs of a toxic relationship and what you can do if you’re in a toxic relationship:

Blaming Others

If your partner or friend or family member is constantly blaming others for things that go wrong and can’t take responsibility, that a sign of a toxic behavior. And if you find yourself making excuses for your partner/friend/family member’s bad behavior, then you are enabling their toxic behavior.

Refusing to Acknowledge a Problem

If someone is shutting you down when you bring up a problem you want to address, that’s a sign of a toxic relationship. It’s important to talk about problems and address them.  In a healthy relationship, both parties should be able to take feedback and adjust.

Draining

A toxic relationship will leave you feeling drained. If you start to notice you’re constantly stressed out by a relationship, it might be a toxic one. It can literally take a toll on your body, leaving you tired and drained.

Controlling

Another sign of a toxic relationship includes controlling behavior under the guise of trying to “help.” If someone is pushy with their opinions, especially when you haven’t asked for their opinions, you may be in a toxic relationship.

Taking Advantage

A toxic relationship will include someone who routinely takes advantage of you and your time, may constantly forget what you have to do, and ask for favors when you told them you’re swamped.

Putting Others Down

In a healthy relationship, both parties feel safe and loved. In a toxic relationship, one or both parties will try to make the other feel bad about themselves. This is a toxic behavior.

Manipulating

In a toxic relationship, you’ll notice your partner/friend/family member tries to manipulate you or try to make you believe something that may not be true. Make sure you have other people in your life who can keep you grounded and help you avoid believing the manipulation.

Threatening

If someone is threatening to leave the relationship as a means to get their way, this is a sure sign of a toxic relationship.

Signs of a Toxic Relationship: What Do I Do?

Now that you know the signs of a toxic relationship, what can you do? You might be thinking that it’s time to break it off with the toxic relationship, but you might also be wondering how you can make things work. If your plan is to break it off with the toxic relationship, then break it off and don’t do the on-again-off-again thing, because that can be toxic too. Instead, do what you can to remove yourself from the toxic relationship and remind yourself of the reasons why it’s unhealthy for you.

If you need, find a friend or a family member who can support you in your decision and help remind you why you broke off the relationship. If after reading the signs of a toxic relationship, you think you might be the toxic one in the relationship, don’t think there’s no chance for you! A therapist can help you work through your unhealthy behaviors so you can have happy, healthy relationships.

If you feel like you need to maintain the relationship, first start by finding a good therapist to help you through the process. Chances are your toxic relationship isn’t going to like that you’re going to be making some changes to the relationship, and a therapist can help you through the transition. Remember that a healthy relationship is about both parties doing their part to make the relationship work. You might want to try bringing your significant other to meet with the therapist as well.

Here are some things your therapist will help you learn and practice:

Making Decisions

Take control of your life and try making your own decisions. Don’t let the toxic relationship dictate your every choice. Start by making small decisions. When you do this, you start to feel like you’re gaining control over your life again.

Establishing Boundaries

It’s important to create healthy boundaries with your toxic relationships. Be clear about what you are willing to do and what you aren’t willing to take. There will be push-back against the boundaries you try to create because your toxic partner/friend/family member isn’t used to you sticking up for yourself. Be firm and repeat your boundaries as necessary.

Learning to Communicate

Learn healthy communication skills. If you need to, take a course or meet with a therapist who will help guide you and your partner through positive communication skills.

Separating

If you find that there’s no way the two of you can cooperate to create a healthy, non-toxic relationship, sometimes the best choice is to separate.

For a more comprehensive list of signs of a toxic relationship, read this article on Psychology Today.

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Discounted Neurofeedback: Mother’s Day Special!

Do you love a good deal? Then you’re going to love a free gift and a discount on neurofeedback!

Aspen Valley Counseling is having a Mother’s Day (May 13) and National Women’s Mental Health Week (May 13–19) special! All women who sign up for neurofeedback before May 19 will receive a discounted price of 20 session for only $37.50 each. You’ll be saving 25 percent per appointment! And the first 10 moms who sign up receive a free gift at the end of their first appointment.

Call us at 801-224-1103 or email us at aspenvalleycounseling.com to schedule your first appointment!

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Neurofeedback Therapy: Treatment for ADHD, Anxiety, Traumatic Brain Injury, and More

If you’re curious about neurofeedback therapy and how it can help you, you’re not the only one. Every month thousands of people look it up in search engines. Why? Because it’s a non-invasive, non-medication therapy that works wonders.

Jessica Harper, the owner of Aspen Valley Counseling, used to get in her car and know she was going to miss the entrance of wherever she was going. Without fail, a chorus of groans sounded off in the back seat of her silver VW bug as her children cried, “Not again!” But after doing neurofeedback therapy, she hasn’t missed an entrance. “It’s pretty amazing that neurofeedback—something so simple in practice—has helped me in such a day-to-day thing.”

In a typical neurofeedback therapy session, a neurofeedback technician places electrodes on a client’s head, and then the computer program creates images on the screen that represent the client’s brain waves. The client will see their own brain activity and learn to change it, which helps them learn to manage their emotions, thoughts, and performance.

Basics of Neurofeedback Therapy

Neurofeedback therapy helps with a myriad of mental health–related issues that deal with the brain. It can help

  • ADD/ADHD
  • Trauma
  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • Addiction
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Phobias
  • Performance (such as for sports)
  • Autism
  • Energy Levels
  • PTSD
  • Brain Injury
  • Meditation

It’s non-invasive and doesn’t involve any medication. So if you’re looking for an alternative to medication, neurofeedback therapy could be something you might want to try.

It may seem too good to be true, but it works wonders for people! For effective treatment, a patient should attend at least 20 sessions (and at least two sessions per week) for long-term results. A patient can finish them faster by doing two sessions per day, five times per week.

If you’re on medication, you can still do neurofeedback therapy. With supervision on your doctor or provider, some people can even cut down or stop using medication after completing neurofeedback therapy.

Cost of Neurofeedback Therapy

Most insurance companies do not cover neurofeedback, since they see it as an unnecessary treatment. Western medicine is typically medication-based, so an insurance company is much more likely to cover costs of medication. But if you don’t want to take medication to improve your mental health, and you’re seeking out alternative medicine, you’re probably going to be paying out of pocket anyway.

Neurofeedback is a great option for someone looking to treat their mental health. Most neurofeedback sessions cost around $75 to $100 per session plus an extra cost for the first appointment. If you’re looking for a cheaper option and you happen to live in Utah, Aspen Valley Counseling in Orem, Utah (Utah County) charges clients $50 per session.

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Mother’s Day Gift Guide

When it’s time to buy a Mother’s Day gift, sometimes we have the perfect gift in mind, but if you’re like most people, you’re probably struggling to figure out what to get mom. Should you get her flowers, chocolate, and lotion again this year?

If you’re last-minute shopping for a Mother’s Day gift, you’re sure to go for the basic gifts, but with the internet, you can get a unique last-minute gift at a moment’s notice. This year, treat mom to something that will help her relax — but not just bubble bath. Try buying her a  unique Mother’s Day gift that will help her feel inspired, relaxed, and cared about during National Women’s Mental Health Week (May 13 through 19).

Mother’s Day Gift Guide

Neurofeedback sessions

What’s neurofeedback? It’s a type of therapy that basically rewires your brain (non-invasively) to help you sleep better, concentrate better, and think more clearly — among other things. It’s a simple process with life-long results. So, if your mom is looking for a semi-quick fix to feeling more relaxed about life, neurofeedback might be what she needs! Right now for Mother’s Day and National Women’s Mental Health Week, Aspen Valley Counseling is giving a discount to all women! Neurofeedback sessions only cost $37.50 per session, and the first 10 moms that sign up get a free gift. (Valid through 5/19)

“The Gift of Imperfection” by Brene Brown

If you haven’t already heard of this book, it’s a great gift for your mom. Women are naturally just a little bit hard on themselves. After reading this book, mom will have much more inner peace with herself that will last longer than any bouquet of flowers.

Massage

Now who doesn’t love a massage? Not only will this give mom a break from the heavy-lifting of life, but it’ll be a Mother’s Day gift that helps her calm her mind for a bit. If you want to give her something that will last longer than an hour-long session or your budget can’t handle a good massage therapist, try a head massager or an electric back massager.

Meditation and Yoga

Moms who are busy (which is basically all moms) will appreciate some time to clear their minds and find a place of peace. If your mom loves exercising, then a gift certificate to a yoga and meditation class will be the perfect break for her muscles. But even if your mom doesn’t exercise regularly, yoga is a great place to start because yoga teachers often have easier stretches for the beginner students. A Mother’s Day gift doesn’t have to be a thing she’ll keep forever. Sometimes it might be nice for her to get a gift she can use up and not have to find a place to store.

Therapy Session

It’s probably not the first thing that comes to mind when you think of a Mother’s Day gift, but a therapy session might be just what that woman in your life needs. Therapy used to have this stigma that only people with “issues” went to therapy. Now, people fess up to their problems and want someone to teach them coping skills. Your mom can learn relaxation skills for anxiety or communication skills for family arguments. Therapy will make her life just a bit easier. You can buy her a gift certificate for a therapy session, but if she’s too busy to take time to go to therapy, then let her know that a therapist can do a video chat or phone call in place on an in-person appointment.

Workbooks

Everyone struggles — including your super woman mother. Get her a Mother’s Day gift that will help her, like a workbook to help her work through some of her struggles, like the Depression relief workbook. If mom’s not quite into workbooks but would prefer a book to read that will give her useful skills, try something like this ADHD book: “Driven To Distraction” by Edward Hallowell and John Ratey.

Plants

Okay, so a plant is a little like getting flowers for a Mother’s Day gift. But do something a little different and get her a plant that requires little upkeep — like a cactus. Then, mom will have something beautiful that lasts and brightens up a room.

But no matter what you get mom for this year’s Mother’s Day gift, she’s sure to love it because it’s from you.

Tell us some ideas for other great mental health–related gifts!